Symposium on Counterfeit Parts and Materials

Technical Symposium and Expo: June 25-26, 2019
Workshops: June 27, 2019

College Park Marriott Hotel & Conference Center
College Park, MD

Workshops

Thursday, June 27 | Martin Hall (Bldg 088), UMD Campus

Workshops will be held on Thursday, led by industry professionals with extensive experience in their respective subject areas. Workshop instructors deliver focused, in-depth presentations on topics of timely importance, based on their research and industry experience.

Please note: the workshops will be located in Glen L. Martin Hall (Bldg 088) on the University of Maryland Campus.

WS1: Use of Component Documentation and Supply Chain for Counterfeit Avoidance

Diganta Das, Ph.D., CALCE

WS2: Utilizing IPC-1782 - Component Traceability - To Reduce Risk Associated With Ingress Of Counterfeit Components

Cameron Shearon, Shearon Consulting & Michael Ford, Aegis Software




WS1: Use of Component Documentation and Supply Chain for Counterfeit Avoidance

Diganta Das, Ph.D., CALCE
Full-Day 8:30am-5:00pm
2164 DeWalt Seminar Room, Martin Hall

Overview
There is NO alternative to good supply chain management as a defense against counterfeit parts. Many types of products that have to be manufactured and supported for long periods of time lack control over critical parts of their supply chain, e.g., avionics and space, telecom infrastructure, and industrial controls. Much of the problem regarding counterfeit electronics is due to lack of due diligence by the part buyers. Understanding of the supply chain and assessing the supply chain before engaging them are necessary steps for any organization. This part of the course will cover how to understand and utilize process change notices for making supply change management and counterfeit detection more efficient. The role of counterfeit part reporting as a legal and technical tool along with its promises and limitations will be discussed with examples. Impact of the US DoD rule changes on the supply chain will be introduced.

Outline

  • Electronic Part Supply Chain
         Participant
         Evolution
  • Assessment of Electronic Part Manufacturers and Parts
  • Assessment of Electronic Part Distributors
         Methods and Case Study
         Standards
  • How to Assess and Utilize Process Change Notices
         Introduction and examples
         Use in counterfeit detection
  • Status of Counterfeit Electronics Related Standards
         Standards Related to Part Distributor Assessment - SAE 6081 and SAE 6496
         JEDEC Standard (JESD243) on "Counterfeit" Parts
         Updates to SAE 5553 and Related ARP, Definitions
         IPC 1782 - Traceability Standard
  • Counterfeit Part Reporting
         Forums for Reporting
         Pros and Cons
  • How to Assess and Utilize Process Change Notices
         Introduction and Examples
         Use in Counterfeit Detection
  • Impact of DFAR Changes in Counterfeit Avoidance
         Features of DFAR
         Impacts of DFAR
  • Closure and Discussion

    Who Should Participate

  • Supply chain managers
  • Design engineers
  • Logistics managers
  • Legal professionals
  • Policy makers on counterfeit prevention
  • Engineers in electronic part selection and management groups



  • WS2: Utilizing IPC-1782 - Component Traceability - To Reduce Risk Associated With Ingress Of Counterfeit Components

    Cameron Shearon, Shearon Consulting & Michael Ford, Aegis Software
    Half-Day 8:30am-12:00pm
    0159 Mechanical Engineering (ME) Conference Room, Martin Hall

    Course Description
    Traceability is a defense against counterfeiters. When you build in verifiable traceability, you protect your product from being copied. IPC has developed a suite of standards for the electronics industry on traceability.

    This course explains how to implement an exact traceability program, based on IPC-1782, to lower the risk and cost of consequences associated with the ingress of counterfeit components. Utilizing automated IIoT data collection with the IPC Connected Factory Exchange (CFX) standard leads to cost-effective, comprehensive data collection. We explain how traceability can be applied, including changes to working practices. We also show how traceability leads to increased quality, productivity, and product reliability.

    Topics Covered:

  • Risk Identification - the need of traceability
  • The benefits of traceability
  • Introduction to IPC-1782
  • Traceability data collection
  • Traceability data storage
  • Operational guidelines for traceability data collection
  • Meeting regulatory and marketplace requirements
  • Traceability as part of the secure supply chain
  • Open discussion
  • This course is for supply-chain managers, designers, component engineers, brand protection specialists, and others.






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