SMTA International

Conference: Sep. 27 - Oct. 1, 2015
Exhibition: Sep. 29 - 30, 2015

Donald Stephens Convention Center
Rosemont, IL, USA
More About SMTA

Tutorials

Half day (3.5 hours) educational courses are led by internationally respected professionals with extensive experience in the subject area. Course instructors deliver focused, in-depth presentations on topics of current importance to the industry, based on their research and industry experience. Tutorials are application oriented and structured to combine field experience with scientific research to solve everyday problems. Tutorials are offered on Sunday, Monday, and Thursday to provide you the opportunity to attend the conference sessions and visit the exhibit floor.

Tutorial registration includes breaks, course materials, and a Certificate of Attendance.
Biographies for all instructors are available.



SUNDAY, September 27, 2015


T1    

Advanced Closed Loop Process Control for Selective Soldering NEW!


Bob Klenke, ITM Consulting
Sunday, September 27 | 8:30am - 12:00pm

Course Objectives
This course outlines techniques that can be utilized to enhance the flexibility, reliability and quality provided by selective soldering equipment. Techniques such as automatic fiducial location and automatic board warpage compensation will be addressed. Advanced drop-jet flux deposition combined with in-process flux verification/calibration as well as mitigation of no-clean flux residues will be covered. The use of integrated dual solder nozzle and combined wave soldering capability for enhanced flexibility is discussed along with 0.5mm ultra-fine pitch selective soldering. Advanced protocols such as graphics-based programming and machine operating software and advances in solder nozzle design to reduce intermetallic buildup for improved solder flow, and striations in solder nozzle design to ensure laminar molten solder flow are also covered. Selective soldering with high melting point (HMP) solder alloys will also be covered in detail. This course is based on real-world consulting practice defining a comprehensive knowledge of the selective soldering process.

Topics Covered

  • Automatic fiducial location
  • Automatic board warpage compensation
  • Advanced drop-jet flux deposition
  • In-process flux verification/ and calibration
  • Mitigation of no-clean flux residues
  • Combined wave soldering capability 0.5mm ultra-fine pitch selective soldering
  • Graphics-based programming and machine operating software
  • Advances in solder nozzle design to reduce intermetallic buildup
  • Striations in solder nozzle design to ensure laminar molten solder flow
  • Selective soldering with high melting point (HMP) solder alloys





    T2    

    It is Time for Low Temperature: Low Temperature Solders, New Developments, and Their Applications NEW!


    Ning-Cheng Lee, Ph.D., Indium Corporation
    Sunday, September 27 | 8:30am - 12:00pm

    Course Objectives
    Since the dawn of the electronics industry, the soldering process encompasses mainly component manufacturing and printed circuit board assembly with hierarchic melting range selection. The former use solder alloys with melting temperature around 300ºC, which will not melt in the subsequent PCB assembly process, where the solders typically melt around 200ºC. Low temperature solders with melting temperature less than 180ºC are currently mainly used for niche applications; however, iNEMI roadmap predicts low temperature soldering to become one of the main stream processes by 2017. Low temperature soldering is greatly desired for a number of special applications, such as heat sensitive devices, systems with more hierarchic levels, parts with significant difference in coefficient of thermal expansion, components exhibiting severe thermal warpage, or products with highly miniaturized design. This course will cover the varieties of low temperature solders with emphasis on lead-free alloys, their physical, mechanical, and soldering properties, and the applications involved with those alloys.

    Topics Covered

  • Market demand & tentative binary alloys options
  • SnIn
  • BiSn
  • BiSn + Ag + Proprietary Dopants
  • BiSn+In, Ni
  • BiSn + Sb, Zn, Ag
  • SnInAg and applications





    T3    

    Stencil Printing – A Practical Guide to Defect Prevention and Yield Improvement


    Chrys Shea, Shea Engineering Services
    Sunday, September 27 | 8:30am - 12:00pm

    Course Objectives
    This course begins with the basics of SMT solder paste stencil printing and ends with the latest research in stencil printing tools and technologies. The class starts with a quick description of printing fundamentals: solder paste characteristics and behaviors, the mechanics of the process and importance of a good setup, and the relationship between aperture sizes and paste deposit formations. It then progresses rapidly into troubleshooting techniques for both general and specific printing issues, and addresses problem prevention through proper stencil design and selection. Moving into advanced technology topics, the course reviews the last five years of independent research on stencil materials, manufacturing processes and nanocoatings, an update of automated Solder Paste Inspection (SPI) technologies, and stencil underwiping. Attendees are encouraged to ask questions or bring specific problems to the class for suggestions and inputs.

    Topics Covered

  • Solder paste
  • Mechanics of the printing process
  • Troubleshooting process problems
  • Stencil design
  • Stencil materials and manufacturing processes
  • Automatic Solder Paste Inspection (SPI)
  • Stencil underwiping
  • Review and Q&A





    T4    

    0201, 01005 & Smaller Design, Assembly, Inspection and Rework NEW!


    Bob Willis, bobwillisonline.com
    Sunday, September 27 | 8:30am - 12:00pm

    Course Objectives
    With the ever-increasing miniaturization and complex features of modern electronic products, there is a growing demand for more densely populated, smaller printed circuit boards. The majority of small passive parts are used on mobile phone modules and small medical applications. In general the majority of devices used on a PCB are passives, therefore a reduction in component size from 0402 to 0201 & 010005 will free-up PCB real estate. The introduction of micro passive parts does however have its drawbacks. The pad sizes required are more difficult to etch, print, and parts require a higher degree of accuracy. The basic substrates we use today expand and contract, making accurate printing difficult directly after the first reflow step. The reflow process with our nitrogen may also cause heavy oxidization of the paste-like grapping defects through the movement of parts, whilst the package size makes inspection and repair more complicated. It will also illustrate the experience seen to date on a number of assembly trials.

    Topics Covered

  • Component technology for 0201, 01005 and beyond
  • Packaging issues
  • Soldering small passives with Lead-Free
  • PCB design requirements
  • Pad sizes spacing
  • Solder joints strength and reliability
  • Printing process
  • Stencil and paste implications
  • Chip component placement requirements
  • Packaging tolerances
  • Reflow soldering defects & prevention
  • Profiling boards
  • Advantages and disadvantages of nitrogen
  • Defects caused by reflow using visual and X-ray inspection
  • Rework and repair methods
  • Types of tools and procedures





    T5    

    Solder Reflow Fundamentals – Thermal Profiles and Defect Mitigation NEW!


    Fred Dimock, BTU International and Karl Seelig, AIM Solder
    Sunday, September 27 | 1:30pm - 5:00pm

    Course Objectives
    This class focuses on how the shape of reflow profiles affects various defects and what the SMT engineer/technician can do to eliminate them. It is designed for the SMT engineers/technicians that want a better understanding of the reflow process, identifies defects, and gives practical troubleshooting steps.

    Topics Covered

  • Recipe and profiles
  • Properties of solder paste
  • Metals and flux
  • Profile shapes
  • Defect identification and mitigation
  • Solder balls
  • Opens
  • Voids
  • Tombstoning





    T6    

    Manufacturing Wrong: Case Studies in Nonconformance NEW!


    David Hillman, Rockwell Collins
    Sunday, September 27 | 1:30pm - 5:00pm

    Course Objectives
    A series of real life case studies of manufacturing issues that have gone haywire when designing and assembling products will be presented. The instructor will cover a variety of "oops" such as plating finish, adhesives, soldering problems. "Experience is what you get right after you need it" and these case studies will detail various aspects from mistakes to the Law of Unintended Consequences.

    Topics Covered

  • Case Study 1: But It’s Just Packaging!
  • Case Study 2: Look At The Pretty Finish!
  • Case Study 3: Stupid Coupons
  • Case Study 4: Never Trust the Salesman
  • Case Study 5: White Residues
  • Case Study 6: Barney Boards
  • Case Study 7: Sanitizers, Lotions & Bears Oh My!
  • Case Study 8: What’s a Tin Whisker?
  • Case Study 9: The Bigger the Glob, the Better the Job
  • Case Study 10: Fried Connectors
  • Case Study 11: I Swear, It’s the Same Process
  • Case Study 12: I Have A "Secret" Technique





    T7    

    SMT Design and Assembly Process Principles for Flexible and Rigid Flex Circuits NEW!


    Vern Solberg, Solberg Technical Consulting
    Sunday, September 27 | 1:30pm - 5:00pm

    Course Objectives
    This course has been developed to furnish participants with an opportunity to explore the full potential of flexible circuit technology, alternative fabrication methodologies and SMT-on-flex assembly processes. The course will also furnish practical flex circuit supplier DfM recommendations for ensuring quality, reliability and manufacturing efficiency and review and discuss the latest revision of IPC-2223, Sectional Design Standard for Flexible Printed Boards. The design principles for flexible and rigid-flex circuits, although similar to rigid circuits, are somewhat unique. Flexible circuits by themselves or when combined with rigid circuit sections, enable unlimited electronic packaging variations. The flexible circuits used to simply interface with other assembly platforms will often eliminate the need for complex wire harness assemblies and connectors, further improving the end product reliability. Because the flex-circuit conductor patterns maintain uniform electrical characteristics they have contributed toward reducing noise, crosstalk, and improving impedance control.

    Topics Covered

    • Applications
      • Establishing end use criteria
      • Commercial/Consumer
      • Industrial/Automotive
      • Medical/Aerospace
    • Material and SMT component
      • Standards for flex and rigid-flex materials
      • Metallization technologies
      • Flex and rigid flex fabrication
      • Circuit routing design rules
    • Designing flexible and rigid-flex circuits
      • Flex circuit outline planning
      • Selection criteria for SMT components
      • SMT land pattern development
      • Surface finish variations
    • Assembly processing of flex and rigid-flex circuits
      • Dimensioning and tolerance criteria
      • Palletized layout for in-line assembly processing
      • SMT assembly process methodologies
      • Alternative joining techniques for flexible circuits





    T8    

    Robotic Iron and Laser Soldering for Lead-Free and High Temperature Alloys NEW!


    Bob Willis, bobwillisonline.com and NPL National Physical Laboratory
    Sunday, September 27 | 1:30pm - 5:00pm

    Course Objectives
    When we start to talk about high temperature electronics it's not the solder, it's all the parts that make up an electronic assembly. Substrates, components, connectors, cables, solder and all of the assembly process need to be examined in detail. Some newer techniques of soldering can reduce the stress on boards and components and also need throughput requirements of modern manufacture. Working at high temperature means between 150-200ºC; however, there are many applications that have to work at much higher levels, up to 300ºC. Typically the industries affected by these hostile working conductions include, aerospace, automotive, petrochemical and military. The use of selective soldering is used with high temperature materials and more recently there is a growth in the use of robotic laser and iron soldering. These systems are being used by telecom and automotive producers with different cored wire combinations. The course is a mixture or theory and practical assembly trial evaluation results with current and future technology using selective soldering plus laser and robotic iron soldering processes at NPL National Physical Laboratory. A FREE copy of the High Temperature Electronics Defect Guide will be provided to each delegate. The defect charts can be printed on site for future reference or training. A guide to major reference sources and publication on high temperature manufacture will be discussed and suppliers providing different assembly resources.

    Topics Covered

  • Oil, gas, space, automotive and military applications reference books, specification and standards
  • Product temperature range
  • Component compatibility
  • PCB substrate choices and specifications and design
  • Soldering alloy choices
  • Assembly & soldering options
  • Setting up and assessment of soldering systems
  • Critical choice in the selection of cored wire for automated assembly
  • Reliability assessment & testing results
  • Failure modes
  • Inspection of solder joints and new defect types





    MONDAY, September 28, 2015


    T9    

    Failure Analysis: Analytical Techniques and What They Tell You About Your Failure


    Martin Anselm, Ph.D., Rochester Institute of Technology
    Monday, September 28 | 8:30am - 12:00pm

    Course Objectives
    When reviewed in conjunction with research or production, failures provide a unique perspective on design for manufacturability and reliability. This course will provide valuable lessons learned from practical experience through discussion of material selection, current electronics research and failure analysis case studies. Analytical techniques for materials characterization will be discussed and how they can be used to determine root cause. Participants are encouraged to bring specific questions or examples of surface mount process difficulties to be shared in open discussion at the end of the course.

    Topics Covered

  • Analytical testing techniques
  • Root causes of production failures
  • Failure analysis studies - analytical techniques used for determining root cause for defects in fine-pitch printing, PoP, and high Tg laminate failures





    T10    

    3D Packaging for the SMT Specialist NEW!


    Charles Bauer, Ph.D., TechLead Corporation
    Monday, September 28 | 8:30am - 12:00pm

    Course Objectives
    This course presents the critical information required to understand the various 3D strategies under development and in production. For example, TSV and Interposers stand out from the others as a 3D device integration approach as opposed to a 3D packaging method. However, no other 3D approach disrupts the existing supply chain so dramatically. Conversely, Package-on-Package, based on well-known SMT assembly technology, promises more modest gains with far less restructuring. Updated annually to include the latest developments, this course covers both the fundamental and advanced technologies that today produce 3D packages for implementation of highly integrated electronic products. These include the challenges of PoP processes characterization, failure analysis, and inspection of 3D assemblies. Using multiple examples of 3D packages in actual usage today, the course also presents a review of the drivers, economics, and intellectual property landscape behind 3D packaging.

    Topics Covered

  • 3D history, trends, and drivers
  • 3D packaging strategies
  • Package on package
  • PoP failure analysis
  • PoP applications
  • Economics of 3D
  • 3D intellectual property landscape





    T11    

    Solder Joint Reliability – Principles and Applications NEW!


    Jennie Hwang, Ph.D., H-Technologies Group
    Monday, September 28 | 8:30am - 12:00pm

    Course Objectives
    This course outlines solder joint reliability fundamentals in fatigue and creep damage mechanisms via ductile, brittle, ductile-brittle fracture, and discusses the critical "players" of solder joint reliability (e.g., intermetallic compounds, manufacturing process, PCB surface finish materials). Likely solder joint failure modes of interfacial, near-interfacial, bulk, inter-phase, intra-phase, voids-induced and surface cracks will be illustrated. To withstand harsh environments, the strengthening metallurgy to further increase fatigue resistance and creep resistance will be addressed, and the power of metallurgy and its ability to anticipate the relative performance will be illustrated by discussing the comparative performance vs. metallurgical phases and microstructure. The question on whether a life-prediction model can assure reliability will be discussed. A relative reliability ranking among commercially available solder systems, as well as the scientific, engineering and manufacturing reasons behind the ranking will be outlined. The course emphasizes on practical, working knowledge, yet balanced and substantiated by science. Attendees are encouraged to bring their own selected systems for deliberation.

    Topics Covered

  • Solder joint fundamentals & thermo-mechanical behavior and degradation – fatigue and creep interaction
  • Solder joint failures modes - interfacial, near-interfacial, bulk, inter-phase, intra-phase, voids-induced, surface-crack, and others
  • Solder joint failure mechanisms – ductile, brittle, ductile-brittle transition fracture
  • Solder joint strengthening metallurgy
  • Intermetallic compounds – different types and effects, at-interface vs. in-bulk, Pb-free vs. Sn-Pb
  • Illustration of microstructure evolution vs. strengthening in Sn Cu+x,y,z and SnAgCu+x,y,z systems
  • Solder joint voids vs. reliability - causes, effects, criteria
  • Solder joint surface-crack –causes, effects
  • Distinctions and commonalties between Pb-free and SnPb solder joints
  • Thermal cycling conditions - effects on test results and test results interpretation
  • Testing solder joint reliability – discriminating tests and discerning parameters
  • Life-prediction model vs. reliability
  • Solder joint performance in harsh environments
  • What are on the horizon and what impact will be on reliability?
  • Best practices and Ultimate reliability





    T12    

    SMT and Through Hole Defect Analysis and Process Troubleshooting - Part 1 NEW!


    S. Manian Ramkumar, Ph.D., Rochester Institute of Technology
    Monday, September 28 | 8:30am - 12:00pm

    Course Objectives
    This is Part 1 of a two-part course series, pertaining to SMT and Through Hole defect analysis and process troubleshooting. This course is aimed at providing a thorough understanding of the SMT and Through Hole defects and the various factors that influence the formation of the defects. Participants will be provided an in-depth look at the possible root causes for defects and their influence on yield. The knowledge gained from this course will help companies enhance product development, and manufacturing yield. Part 2 of the workshop series will use case studies to teach participants a systematic approach to solve process problems and identify the true root cause(s) for defects.

    Topics Covered

    • SMT and THT Process
      • Assembly types and processes
    • Process defects and definitions
      • Identifying different defects
    • Factors influencing the process defects
      • PCB related
      • Component related
      • Materials related
      • Equipment related
      • Process related
      • Supplier related
      • Employee/Knowledge related
      • Environment related
    • Possible root causes for defects based upon factors





    T13    

    ZEN and Science of Electronic Assembly - Best Practices in SMT Assembly - Part 1 NEW!


    Phil Zarrow and Jim Hall, ITM Consulting
    Monday, September 28 | 8:30am - 12:00pm

    Course Objectives
    You have the responsibility and resources to improve the productivity of an assembly operation...what do you do? This course drives awareness and solutions to the adverse impact that non-optimal assembly practices and processes have on the product quality and financial success of electronic assembly businesses. A comprehensive perspective on problem issues is developed for the most currently critical electronic assembly process, materials (both existing and emerging), equipment, procedures, and methods. Most importantly, practical solutions are presented. Key issues that consistently result in assembly problems and low yields are identified and resolved. This course is intended for anyone involved in directing, developing, managing and/or executing assembly line operations including managers, line supervisors and line engineers involved in manufacturing, design and quality engineering

    Topics Covered

    • Introduction
    • Definition of "best practices"
    • Best practices in the assembly process
    • Solder paste printing process best practices
      • Stencil
      • Solder paste
      • Printing
    • Pick and place best practices
    • Reflow soldering best practices





    T14    

    Reliability of Electronics – The Role of Intermetallic Compounds NEW!


    Jennie Hwang, Ph.D., H-Technologies Group
    Monday, September 28 | 1:30pm - 5:00pm

    Course Objectives
    Intermetallic compounds play an increasingly critical role to the performance and reliability of solder interconnections in the chip level, package level and board level of lead-free electronics. This course covers all relevant and important aspects of intermetallic compounds ranging from scientific fundamentals to practical application scenarios. Intermetallic compounds before solder joint formation, during solder joint formation and after solder joint formation in storage and service will be examined. The course also examines intermetallics at-interface and in-bulk, as well as the PCB surface finish/component coating in relation to reliability. The difference between SnPb and Pb-free solder joint in terms of intermetallic compounds, which in turn is attributed to production-floor phenomena and the actual field failure, will be discussed. The course will also address the newer lead-free alloys that were recently introduced to the market.

    Topics Covered

  • Intermetallic compounds – definition, fundamentals, characteristics
  • Phase diagrams of Pb-free solders in contrast with SnPb
  • Intermetallic compounds in the intrinsic material- Pb-free vs. SnPb
  • Formation and growth during production process and in product service life
  • Different types of intermetallic compounds – effects on solder joint reliability
  • Intermetallic compounds - at-interface vs. in-bulk
  • Effects from substrate compositions (hybrid module thick film pads, PCB surface finish) + component surface coating
  • SAC alloys incorporated with various doping elements – characteristics, performance
  • Effects on failure mode
  • Effects on reliability.





    T15    

    "Tipping Point" Cleaning and Deflux NEW!


    Barbara Kanegsberg and Ed Kanegsberg, BFK Solutions
    Monday, September 28 | 1:30pm - 5:00pm

    Course Objectives
    Cleaning and defluxing processes are critical for successful electronics assembly. Performance requirements are more challenging, components are smaller and have lower standoffs; assemblies are more densely populated; customers require rapid response and cost-competitive assemblies. Success depends on knowing the cleaning requirements of both current and potential customers. This course will present the basics of cleaning and defluxing for electronic designers and assemblers including principles of getting the cleaning agents to the area to be cleaned, removing flux and other soils and leaving the area residue free. The right amount of cleaning at the right point in the process can make the difference between success and failure. Attendees will learn when, what, how and how much to clean. The course will cover case studies including aqueous and solvent processes. We will include initial results of studies with new cleaning agents conducted with Dr. Darren Williams at Sam Houston State University.

  • Cleaning and defluxing – why you need both
  • How soils stick; how to remove them
  • When to use your current cleaning process; when you need something different
  • How to get a problematic supply chain to support effective cleaning
  • Cleaning for high value applications like medical devices and aerospace/military
  • How regulations affect cleaning options
  • New developments in cleaning agents and processes
  • Identify important tests for both ionic and non-ionic residues
  • How to use successful cleaning and defluxing as a marketing tool





    T16    

    Design for Manufacturing (DFM): Today's Design Challenges Require New Assembly Methods


    Dale Lee, Plexus Corp.
    Monday, September 28 | 1:30pm - 5:00pm

    Course Objectives
    Traditional DFM for electronic assembly has been to match the product design to the assembly process. With today's designs containing wide diversity of technologies, this is not practical, as component packaging diversity within the design has increased, availability of alternate assembly processes and materials/finishes have expanded. This course will familiarize the participants with limitations of industry standards, assembly tolerances, material compatibility, methodologies and introduce the concept of matching the assembly process to the design. Topics included will be PCB design impacts on assembly, PCB fabrication, and solder process constraints, including several examples of actual product design, manufacturing tooling design, and SMT and PTH assembly process matching failures.

    Topics Covered

  • Elements of Global Product Design Process
  • Printed Circuit Board design impacts on soldering process/quality
  • SMT solder process design impacts: thermal balance, trace routing, process tooling design, assembly equipment limitation/tolerance, industry standards, PCB finishes, BTC-low stand-off components (LGA, QFN)
  • Through hole component solder process design impacts: thermal connection, hole size, pad design, lead free solder impacts, PCB finishes
  • Cleaning Impacts





    T17    

    SMT and Through Hole Defect Analysis and Process Troubleshooting - Part 2 NEW!


    S. Manian Ramkumar, Ph.D., Rochester Institute of Technology
    Monday, September 28 | 1:30pm - 5:00pm

    Course Objectives
    This is Part 2 of a two part workshop series, pertaining to SMT and Through Hole defect analysis and process troubleshooting. This course is aimed at providing a good understanding of a systematic problem solving approach that can be used for troubleshooting the Surface Mount Technology (SMT) and Through Hole electronics packaging process, to avoid defects. This hands-on problem solving session will engage the participants actively using case studies. The participants will work in teams and solve the problem by thoroughly defining the problem, finding the true root causes and determining the appropriate fix. The knowledge gained from this workshop will help companies enhance product development, and manufacturing yield through systematically addressing the root causes of any problem. Part 1 of the series will provide an in-depth look at the factors influencing the SMT and Through Hole process, root causes for defects and their impact on yield.

    Topics Covered

    • Creating a problem statement
      • Initial problem definition
      • Ideal vs. actual
      • Data collection
      • Questioning to the void (data collection)
      • Process flow mapping
      • What? Where? When? Extent?
      • Final problem definition (object and defect)
    • Organizing the data related to the problem
      • "Is" and "Is Not" comparison
      • Differences influencing the "Is" and "Is Not"
      • Changes influencing the differences
    • Identifying probable root cause(s)
      • Testing the possible root causes
      • Selecting the most probable cause
      • Verifying the most probable cause
    • Finding a fix for the root cause
      • Developing and classifying the objectives (Must and Want)
      • Identifying and evaluating the alternatives
      • Identify the risks with alternatives
      • Final decision for a fix
      • Testing the fix





    T18    

    ZEN and Science of Electronic Assembly - Best Practices in SMT Assembly - Part 2 NEW!


    Phil Zarrow and Jim Hall, ITM Consulting
    Monday, September 28 | 1:30pm - 5:00pm

    Course Objectives
    You have the responsibility and resources to improve the productivity of an assembly operation...what do you do? This course drives awareness and solutions to the adverse impact that non-optimal assembly practices and processes have on the product quality and financial success of electronic assembly businesses. A comprehensive perspective on problem issues is developed for the most currently critical electronic assembly process, materials (both existing and emerging), equipment, procedures, and methods. Most importantly, practical solutions are presented. Key issues that consistently result in assembly problems and low yields are identified and resolved. This seminar is intended for anyone involved in directing, developing, managing and/or executing assembly line operations including managers, line supervisors and line engineers involved in manufacturing, design and quality engineering.

    Topics Covered

    • Best practices in the assembly process - continued
      • Wave and selective soldering best practices
      • Cleaning vs No-Clean considerations and best practices
    • Best Practices concerning "challenging technologies"
      • QFNs
      • Ultra-miniature components (0201s, 01005s, ultra-fine pitch BGAs and CSPs)
    • Q&A





    THURSDAY, October 1, 2015


    Complimentary half day course for SMTA and IPC MEMBERS!
    You are required to register to receive a handout and a Certificate of Attendance, but there is no charge for the course. (Non-member rate applies.)



    T19    

    LED, BGA, and QFN Assembly and Inspection NEW!


    Bill Cardoso, Ph.D., Creative Electron
    Thursday, October 1 | 8:30am - 12:00pm

    Course Objectives
    In this tutorial we will cover the manufacturing of the most challenging surface mount parts to assemble and inspect today: LEDs, BGAs, and QFNs. The tutorial will focus on the pitfalls of manufacturing and inspecting PCBs with these devices. The presentations will provide content to solve many of the technical challenges encountered by luminaire integrators and contract manufacturers. We will use a library of inspected assemblies to provide attendees with real life examples of assembly issues. Attendees are welcome to send their own assemblies to Creative Electron prior to the tutorial so that the material can be used during training. For more information, please contact info@creativeelectron.com or 760-752-1192

    Topics Covered

  • How LED material handling and storage impact assembly performance
  • LED x-ray inspection: How voids cost you money
  • Case study: How lack of quality killed a successful LED company
  • Process design for BGA and QFN assembly and rework
  • BGA and QFN x-ray inspection: How to see what often goes wrong
  • X-Ray as a tool for quality process design and control




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